MSMC Chair David Lueck Visits Ghana, Sees Africa as a New Frontier for Missouri Soy

From left: David Lueck and Illinois soybean leaders Daryl Cates and Bill Wykes join USDA Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden at the Akate feed mill that is already purchasing U.S. soybean meal.
From left: David Lueck and Illinois soybean leaders Daryl Cates and Bill Wykes join USDA Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden at the Akate feed mill that is already purchasing U.S. soybean meal.

Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council Chair David Lueck traveled to the West African country of Ghana in November where he saw new markets for Missouri soy.

Lueck joined ASA’s World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) Program in a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) trade mission to the West African country of Ghana. USDA Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden led the delegation with representatives of 26 U.S. companies and agricultural organizations from across the United States.

“Their economy is rising. I believe Africa will be a new frontier for Missouri soy, and U.S.-produced poultry meat.” Lueck says.

“I am very optimistic that we can work with some of the local businesses,” he adds. “They do not have good sources of protein, but they are getting more up to date on the nutrition of soy and are very interested in better nutrition for livestock and human consumption.”

“Their poultry industry is growing, and their egg industry can use a jumpstart. They don’t produce a lot of eggs there because they don’t have the sources of protein for the poultry and they need consumer education on eggs.”

Lueck participated in the project launch for WISHH’s new five-year USDA-funded poultry industry support project in Ghana. USDA’s Harden and the Ghanaian Minister of Food and Agriculture Fifi Kwetey officiated.

Lueck and Cates found U.S. Tyson leg quarters are already sold in the Ghanaian market place along with U.S. soybean meal and whole soybeans.
Lueck and Cates found U.S. Tyson leg quarters are already sold in the Ghanaian market place along with U.S. soybean meal and whole soybeans.

“The Food for Progress agreements are the latest example of the partnership between the people of Ghana and the United States,” Harden said. “When the government of Ghana asked for assistance to improve its poultry sector, USDA and its partners were ready to help.”

WISHH’s work focuses on educating producers about the importance of high-quality feed and improves the industry’s capacity to test feed. If U.S. soybeans and poultry are to have market access to Ghana then Ghana’s own agriculture must also progress.

“It is a world economy with global markets,” Lueck says. “We need to help the rest of the world, and when we can use our products in those countries then it is good for U.S. agriculture. It helps everyone.”

More information about potential demand in Africa is available from WISHH and its partner organizations online, and in this PDF from the trip briefing materials.